The Canadian Football League

Best and Worst Regular Season Records

Canadian Football League Best Seasons
Team Year(s) GP W L T Pct
1 Edmonton 1989 18 16 2 0 0.889
2 Calgary 2016 18 15 2 1 0.861
3 Calgary 2014, 1995, 1994, 1993 18 15 3 0 0.833
Montreal 2009 18 15 3 0 0.833
Toronto 1997, 1996 18 15 3 0 0.833
Baltimore 1995 18 15 3 0 0.833
7 Edmonton 1981 16 14 1 1 0.906
8 BC 2007 18 14 3 1 0.806
9 Saskatchewan 1970 16 14 2 0 0.875
Winnipeg 1960 16 14 2 0 0.875
Canadian Football League Worst Seasons
Team Year(s) GP W L T Pct
1 Hamilton 2003 18 1 17 0 0.056
2 Saskatchewan 1959 16 1 15 0 0.063
3 Winnipeg 1964 16 1 14 1 0.094
4 BC 1961 16 1 13 2 0.125
5 Ottawa 2014 18 2 16 0 0.111
Hamilton 1997 18 2 16 0 0.111
Ottawa 1988 18 2 16 0 0.111
8 Montreal 1982 16 2 14 0 0.125
Toronto 1981 16 2 14 0 0.125
Saskatchewan 1980, 1979 16 2 14 0 0.125
Winnipeg 1970 16 2 14 0 0.125
Edmonton 1963 16 2 14 0 0.125

CFL Historical Attendance

CFL Games Played Leaders

  • 408 – Lui Passaglia
  • 394 – Bob Cameron
  • 373 – Damon Allen
  • 347 – Wayne Shaw
  • 339 – Paul McCallum
  • 329 – Anthony Calvillo
  • 328 – Wayne Smith
  • 321 – Miles Gorrell
  • 304 – Paul Osbaldiston
  • 298 – Danny McManus
  • 293 – Troy Westwood
  • 292 – Terry Baker
  • 288 – Leo Groenewegen
  • 287 – Ron Lancaster
  • 286 – Gene Makowsky
  • 280 – Mark McLoughlin
  • 276 – Henry Burris
  • 274 – Rod Connop
  • 271 – Mike O'Shea
  • 271 – Roger Aldag

Record Streaks for the CFL Regular Season

Winning Streak
Overall
  • 14 games – Calgary Stampeders
    (July 21, 2016 — Oct. 21, 2016)
  • 14 games – BC Lions
    (Oct. 17, 2004 — Sept. 17, 2005)
  • 12 games – Winnipeg Blue Bombers
    (Aug. 3, 2001 — Oct. 20, 2001)
Home
  • 27 games – Calgary Stampeders
    (Sept. 20, 1992 — Aug. 6, 1995)
  • 17 games – Calgary Stampeders
    (Oct. 31, 2015 — Sept. 29, 2017)
  • 17 games – Toronto Argonauts
    (July 17, 1996 — Oct. 18, 1997)
Visitor
  • 20 games – Winnipeg Blue Bombers
    (Aug. 11, 1960 — Sept. 10, 1962)
  • 9 games – Saskatchewan Roughriders
    (Sept. 10, 1969 — Aug. 26, 1970)
  • 9 games – Winnipeg Blue Bombers
    (Sept. 13, 1958 — Sept. 5, 1959)
Unbeaten Streak
Overall
  • 16 games – Calgary Stampeders
    (July 1, 2016 — Oct. 21, 2016)
  • 15 games – Edmonton Eskimos
    (July 26, 1981 — July 17, 1982)
  • 14 games – BC Lions
    (Oct. 17, 2004 — Sept. 17, 2005)
Home
  • 27 games – Calgary Stampeders
    (Sept. 20, 1992 — Aug. 6, 1995)
  • 18 games – BC Lions
    (Nov. 4, 1962 — Aug. 7, 1965)
  • 17 games – Calgary Stampeders
    (Oct. 31, 2015 — Sept. 29, 2017)
Visitor
  • 20 games – Winnipeg Blue Bombers
    (Aug. 11, 1960 — Sept. 10, 1962)
  • 9 games – Edmonton Eskimos
    (Oct. 16, 1977 — Oct. 15, 1978)
  • 9 games – Saskatchewan Roughriders
    (Sept. 10, 1969 — Aug. 26, 1970)
Losing Streak
Overall
  • 14 games – Shreveport Pirates
    (July 6, 1994 — Oct. 8, 1994)
  • 13 games – Hamilton Tiger-Cats
    (Oct. 27, 2002 — Sept. 6, 2003)
  • 13 games – Ottawa Rough Riders
    (July 19, 1987 — Oct. 24, 1987)
Home
  • 14 games – Ottawa Rough Riders
    (July 19, 1987 — Oct. 8, 1988)
  • 10 games – Toronto Argonauts
    (Aug. 15, 2008 — Aug. 28, 2009)
  • 9 games – Hamilton Tiger-Cats
    (Sept. 29, 2002 — Sept. 1, 2003)
Visitor
  • 18 games – Ottawa Rough Riders
    (Oct. 1, 1994 — Aug. 24, 1996)
  • 18 games – Toronto Argonauts
    (July 9, 1992 — Nov. 7, 1993)
  • 15 games – Ottawa Rough Riders
    (Aug. 27, 1988 — Oct. 15, 1989)
Winless Streak
Overall
  • 16 games – Saskatchewan Roughriders
    (Sept. 11, 1999 — Aug. 18, 2000)
  • 16 games – Montreal Alouettes
    (Sept. 15, 1968 — Sept. 10, 1969)
  • 14 games – Shreveport Pirates
    (July 6, 1994 — Oct. 8, 1994)
Home
  • 14 games – Ottawa Rough Riders
    (July 19, 1987 — Oct. 8, 1988)
  • 12 games – Saskatchewan Roughriders
    (Aug. 14, 1959 — Sept. 16, 1960)
  • 10 games – Toronto Argonauts
    (Aug. 15, 2008 — Aug. 28, 2009)
Visitor
  • 18 games – Ottawa Rough Riders
    (Oct. 1, 1994 — Aug. 24, 1996)
  • 18 games – Toronto Argonauts
    (July 9, 1992 — Nov. 7, 1993)
  • 15 games – Ottawa Rough Riders
    (Aug. 27, 1988 — Oct. 15, 1989)

Full all-time record streaks, queries and drill down

CFL Notes

  • League Formed: January 19, 1958
  • Seasons suspended: None
  • Seasons operated: 60 and counting

History

The Canadian Football League was formed in 1958 when the nine founding franchises – Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Saskatchewan, Calgary, Edmonton and BC – withdrew the Canadian Football Council from the Canadian Rugby Union, renamed the CFC the Canadian Football League and appointed G. Sydney Halter the league’s Commissioner.

Canadian football developed from rugby roots and professional Canadian Football originated from various Rugby Unions in Canada which date as far back as 1861. The modern era of Canadian Football is generally agreed to begin in 1954 when the Grey Cup, the now symbol of professional football supremacy in Canada, became exclusively contested by professional teams.

The league has consisted of nine teams throughout most of its history. From 1987 to 1992 eight teams formed the league after the Montreal franchise withdrew from play. The 1990’s saw a period of American expansion and in 1993, the first franchise in the United States of America played out of Sacramento, California. For the 1996 season, American operations ceased and the Montreal franchise returned the CFL to it’s original nine franchises. The following year the Ottawa Rough Riders franchise withdrew. Football returned to Ottawa from 2002 to 2005 as the Ottawa Renegades. The Ottawa RedBlacks team became the CFL‘s 9th franchise again in 2014. Long term, the CFL is looking to Quebec City or the Maritimes as the location of its tenth franchise.

The CFL is known as a wide open, fast paced and exciting game to watch. While it had a period of financial struggles through most of the 1980’s and 1990’s, it consistently maintained an exciting product and produced many star players during this period. The league has experienced an upswing in popularity since 1996, returning it to its previous peak level of prominence in Canada.

“There is no team sport known to civilized man which is more spectacular, dramatic, bruising — brutal even — or yet more fascinating than professional football.”

Gordon Currie in 100 Years of Canadian Football Toronto: Pagurian Press, 1968.